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Separation of ethylene and ethane by adsorption on titanosilicate

  • Author / Creator
    Shi, Meng
  • The energy costs associated with ethane-ethylene separation could be significantly reduced by the development of alternatives to cryodistillation. This work examined ethylene recovery by equilibrium adsorption on two types of titanosilicate molecular sieve adsorbents, Na-ETS-10 and Zn-RPZ. A practical adsorptive separation of industrial process gas, with a measured binary bed selectivity for ethylene over ethane of approximately 5 at 25°C and 1 atm, was demonstrated using Na-ETS-10 as the adsorbent. The effects of different binder systems and separation flow rates on the mass transfer properties of Na-ETS-10 were examined in order to optimize the separation. High pressure and low temperature, similar to the working conditions in ethylene production plants, were found to increase the separation factor for these materials. Thermal, steam and microwave desorption methods were compared, and microwave desorption was determined to be the most efficient option for ethylene/ethane desorption and Na-ETS-10 regeneration.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2010-06
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R35X2G
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Steven Kuznicki (Chemical and Materials Engineering)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Steven Kuznicki (Chemical and Materials Engineering)
    • Jeffrey Stryker (Chemistry)
    • Tony Yeung (Chemical and Materials Engineering)