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Oil sand overburden characterization within the mine area of Syncrude Lease No. 17 for reclamation of spent oil sand

  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
  • For the establishment and growth of plants, spent oil sand lacks Ca, K, NO3-N, available P, Zn, CEC and available water storage capacity. Cu, Mn and possibly SO4-S are marginally adequate in spent sand. Oil sand overburden materials within the mine area of Syncrude Lease No. 17 were sampled and analyzed with the intent of isolating mineral materials overlying lean oil sand which may be useful in the amelioration and reclamation of spent oil sand. Overburden materials were broadly identified. Physical properties analyzed and discussed include: saturation percent, particle size distribution, soil moisture storage capacity, and specific surface and Atterberg limits on selected samples. Chemical properties analyzed and discussed include: pH, EC, SAR, major water soluble cations and anions, major extractable cations, CEC, NO3-N, total N, available P and DTPA-extractable Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn. Fine-textured materials within the mine area of Syncrude Lease No. 17 have a limited distribution. Heavy clay materials, particularily, have sufficient levels of Ca, K, Zn, Cu, Mn and SO4-S and a sufficiently high CEC and available water storage capacity to contribute substantially in the amelioration and reclamation of spent oil sand.

  • Date created
    1976
  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Type of Item
    Report
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3CJ87M6P
  • License
    This material is provided under educational reproduction permissions included in Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development's Copyright and Disclosure Statement, see terms at http://www.environment.alberta.ca/copyright.html. This Statement requires the following identification: \"The source of the materials is Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development http://www.environment.gov.ab.ca/. The use of these materials by the end user is done without any affiliation with or endorsement by the Government of Alberta. Reliance upon the end user's use of these materials is at the risk of the end user.