Usage
  • 38 views
  • 112 downloads

Neurosilence: intracerebral applications of protein synthesis inhibitors eliminate neural activity

  • Author / Creator
    Sharma, Arjun V
  • The acquisition of a behavioural response (learning) and the later retrieval of this response (memory) are separated by an endogenous biological process which consolidates the temporary neural changes initiated by training. Intracerebral infusions of stimulants to the hippocampus potentiate this process and infusions of protein synthesis inhibitors (PSIs) impair it. A tacit assumption regarding the application of PSIs is that they have no effect upon spontaneous brain electrical activity; however, given their documented non-specific side effects, this idea was re-evaluated under controlled conditions. Hippocampal recordings were made in urethane anaesthetized rats before and after unilateral hippocampal infusions of the PSIs anisomycin and cycloheximide. Infusions suppressed local field potentials, eliminated sink/source alternations and silenced multiunit activity without affecting the contralateral hippocampus. This suppression was correlated with the degree of protein synthesis inhibition. These results present a serious confound for all results obtained using anisomycin and cycloheximide to test memory consolidation.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2010-11
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3R046
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Psychology
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Dickson, Clayton T (Psychology, Physiology, Centre for Neuroscience)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Spetch, Marcia (Psychology)
    • Caplan, Jeremy B (Psychology, Centre for Neuroscience)
    • Ali, Declan (Biological Sciences, Centre for Neuroscience)