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Using Survival Prediction Techniques to Learn Consumer-Specific Reservation Price Distributions

  • Author / Creator
    Jin, Ping
  • A consumer's "reservation price" (RP) is the highest price that s/he is willing to pay for one unit of a specified product or service. It is an essential concept in many applications, e.g., personalized pricing, auction and negotiation. While consumers will not volunteer their RPs, we may be able to predict these values, based on each consumer's specific information, using a model learned from earlier consumer transactions. This thesis proposes a novel framework of learning RP distributions that involves a model of formulating the relationship between consumers' RPs and their purchasing decisions, and a data collection method. Within this framework, we show a way to estimate the consumer-specific RP distribution using techniques from the survival prediction --- here viewing the consumers' purchasing choices as the censored observations. To validate our new framework of RP, we run experiments on realistic data, with four survival methods. These models performed very well (under three different criteria) on the task of estimating consumer-specific RP distributions, which shows that our RP framework can be effective. As we found that the multi-task logistic regression model (MTLR) dominated the other models under all three evaluation criteria, we explored ways to extend it, leading to extensions that are more general and more flexible. Moreover, we prove that it is the general regularizer, instead of the smoothness regularizer, that results in a smooth predicted distribution; this leads further simplification of the MTLR model.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2015-06
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R31G0J19D
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Computing Science
  • Specialization
    • Statistical Machine Learning
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Greiner, Russell (Computing Science)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Bowling, Michael (Computing Science)
    • Greiner, Russell (Computing Science)
    • Schuurmans, Dale (Computing Science)