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Inhaled Aerosols Targeted via Magnetic Alignment of High Aspect Ratio Particles: An In Vivo and Optimization Study

  • Author / Creator
    Redman, Gillian
  • An in vivo study with 19 rabbits was completed. Half of the exposed rabbits had a magnetic field placed externally over their right lung. Magnetic resonance images of the lungs were acquired to determine the iron concentrations in the right and left lung of each animal. The right/left ratio increased in the middle and basal regions of the lung. With further optimization, this technique could be an effective method for targeted drug delivery. Additionally, the feasibility of increasing the length of high aspect ratio particles for improved targeted drug delivery was explored. An ultrasonic nozzle was pulsed into a large evaporation chamber. Individual particles were found to be double the original length. However, due to locally increased humidity the droplets were not dried, except with the use of an orifice to rapidly accelerate and break apart the larger droplets. The complications associated with this method make it an undesirable and unfeasible method of creating longer particles.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2011-06
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Masters of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3KX4Z
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Mechanical Engineering
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Finlay, Warren (Mechanical Engineering)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Vehring, Reinhard (Mechanical Engineering)
    • Thompson, Richard (Biomedical Engineering)