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Crippling Masculinities: Disabled Men's Intersectional Narratives Through Fashion

  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
  • SSHRC Awarded IG 2019: Our four-year study explores how disabled men with diverse impairments and subject positions experience and enact masculinity through fashion. We use fashion as a research context and an arts-based method to generate new understandings of masculinity and disability. Our project seeks to "crip" dominant narratives of disabilities and masculinities by amplifying the experiences of men at the margins of both categories. This project will use a qualitative arts-based methodology through four cumulative phases. The study is conducted in Toronto and Edmonton. In Phase 1, we will conduct wardrobe interviews with 70 disabled men across a range of physical, sensory and cognitive impairments and ethnic, sexual and other subject positions to illuminate the diversity of disabled men's gendered identities through fashion (Years 1-2). In Phase 2, participants from these interviews will be invited to take part in workshops during which they will deconstruct and recreate clothing to generate new understandings of masculinities and disabilities, and then be interviewed about the meanings behind the garments they created (Years 2-3). In Phase 2, we will develop fashion shows to share results from wardrobe interviews and workshops with non-academic audiences. We will document the fashion shows and also interview the audiences about how these shows influences their views of masculinity and disability (Years 3-4). Phase 4 will focus on the analysis of the fashion shows and on comparison between the two cities by using data from the past three phase.

  • Date created
    2018-10-07
  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Type of Item
    Research Material
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/r3-jb91-as73
  • License
    © Strickfaden, Megan. All rights reserved other than by permission. This document embargoed to those without UAlberta CCID until 2025.