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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R34746Z3H

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Chemical Isotope Labeling LC-MS for Human Saliva and Urine Metabolomics Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Metabolomics
LC-MS
Mass Spectrometry
Isotope Labeling
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Tran, Tran TN
Supervisor and department
Li, Liang (Chemistry)
Examining committee member and department
Serpe, Michael (Chemistry)
Vederas, John (Chemistry)
Department
Department of Chemistry
Specialization

Date accepted
2015-01-27T10:43:45Z
Graduation date
2015-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The objective of this work was to employ differential 13C/12C dansyl chloride (DnsCl) derivatization strategies for qualitative and quantitative profiling of amine- and phenol-containing metabolites by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization Fourier Transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-ESI FT-ICR-MS). A method based on the use of this isotope labeling LC-MS platform was optimized for human salivary metabolome analysis, aiming for the discovery of metabolite biomarkers in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s diseases (AD). In addition, a large scale metabolomics study was performed on 100 urine samples taken during a 3 continuous day period. All samples were analyzed using the isotope labelling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry methodology. A pragmatic approach combining well-established statistical tools was developed to process this large data set in order to generate metabolic profiles of those samples.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R34746Z3H
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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