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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3CW88

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The effect of a go/no-go naming task on fMRI BOLD activation in the ventral visual processing stream Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
ventral stream
activation
Go/No-Go
reading
fMRI
dorsolateral
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Amyotte, Josee J.
Supervisor and department
Cummine, Jacqueline (Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology)
Boliek, Carol (Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology)
Examining committee member and department
Bolger, Patrick (Linguistics)
Westbury, Chris (Psychology)
Department
Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-07T18:31:04Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Background: The go/no-go naming behavioural paradigm has furthered our understanding of basic reading processes, however, its neural representations remain largely unknown. Pilot data using this task (with nonwords) produced fMRI ventral stream activation for regular and exception words. This activation may be due to subjects‘ strategic reliance on phonology or orthography. Accordingly, using pseudohomophones in a go/no-go naming task served to elucidate behavioural and neural activation associated with the evaluation of orthography. Method: Subjects (n=10) were instructed to name aloud letter string stimuli if they spelt a real word, during a go/no-go reading task with pseudohomophones. Results: Using pseudohomophones as a foil should have forced subjects to rely solely on orthography, resulting in ventral stream activation. Conversely, activation was constrained primarily to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Discussion: Manipulation of the experiment‘s instructions forced participants to rely on higher-level cognitive functions to complete the go/no-go paradigm.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3CW88
Rights
License granted by Josee Amyotte (amyotte@ualberta.ca) on 2011-09-02T07:29:23Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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