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Efficacy and side-effect profiles of lactulose, docusate sodium, and sennosides compared to PEG in opioid-induced constipation: A systematic review Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
senokot
docusate sodium
lactulose
constipation
colace
systematic review
polyethylene glycol
opioid
opioid induced constipation
sennosides
treatment
PEG
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Kerridge, Teresa A.
Supervisor and department
Hunter, Kathleen (Nursing)
Examining committee member and department
Hunter, Kathleen (Nursing)
Cummings, Greta (Nursing)
Lazarescu, Adriana (Gastroenterology)
Department
Faculty of Nursing
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-01-31T09:03:02Z
Graduation date
2012-06
Degree
Master of Nursing
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is an unpleasant and ubiquitous side effect of opioid treatment. Ineffective treatment of OIC can result in decreased adherence to opioid therapy, decreased quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality. The constipating effects of opioids result from their inhibitory effects on μ, κ, and δ receptors in the gastrointestinal tract causing hard and dry stools, prolonged transit time, decreased gastric secretions, and ineffective colonic emptying. Current treatment of OIC occurs by trial and error; little evidence exists to guide practice. Docusate sodium, sennosides, and lactulose are common drugs used in constipation prevention and management in OIC. This systematic review investigates whether PEG is superior to doscusate sodium, sennosides, and/or lactulose in the treatment of OIC. Despite extensive search strategies, no studies met our inclusion criteria. Consequently, insufficient evidence exists to address this clinical question. Further research is required and high-powered, well-designed clinical trials are economically feasible.
Language
English
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
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File size: 780451
Last modified: 2015:10:12 14:37:25-06:00
Filename: Kerridge_Teresa_Spring2012.pdf
Original checksum: 8c740a6011dc44c83dc0e5f772d51b2e
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Status message: File header gives version as 1.4, but catalog dictionary gives version as 1.3
File author: Teresa Kerridge
Page count: 77
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