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SIMULATING CHLORAMINE DISSIPATION IN STORMWATER NETWORKS: A DECISION SUPPORT FRAMEWORK FOR POLLUTANT HAZARD ASSESSMENT

  • Author / Creator
    Mohamed Gaafar
  • Concerns about total residual chlorine effects on the aquatic
    environment have led to a lowering of allowable effluent discharge
    concentrations. Many municipalities use monochloramine as a water disinfectant, which makes its way into drainage systems through outdoor and industrial water uses, and ultimately into surface waters. Monochloramine is known to dissipate with variable temporal and spatial decay coefficients; however, no existing stormwater models simulate these aspects. Thus, this study describes a novel Variable Decay Coefficient
    Simulator (VDCS) that predicts levels of degradable substances in sewer systems. The importance of spatially- and temporally-varying monochloramine decay coefficients on pollutant concentrations was assessed through three scenarios using, (1) a constant decay coefficient,
    (2) spatially-varying decay coefficients per land-use; and (3) spatially- and temporally-varying decay coefficients. At the system outfall, the spatially- and temporally-varying decay coefficients generated 67% and 100% higher concentrations, respectively, than the constant decay coefficient. These differences have important implications for the modeling of degradable pollutants in stormwater systems, and for the
    application of environmental regulations.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    Fall 2019
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Doctor of Philosophy
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/r3-b2k0-m786
  • License
    Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.