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Understanding the relationships between pregnancy, childbirth and incontinence

  • Author / Creator
    Prendergast, Susan
  • The purpose of this thesis was to explore the relationships between pregnancy, childbirth and incontinence (both urinary and faecal) and the effect of preventive activities during pregnancy on continence. Two papers comprise this thesis. The first paper, a scoping review, focused on examination of how pregnancy and childbirth affect continence in nulliparous women. Several key considerations were identified from the published literature that we suggest are crucial to understanding these relationships. The second paper, a systematic review, is focused on the effect of preventive measures during pregnancy on continence. Pelvic floor muscle training was found to be effective in reducing the incidence of incontinence at 3 months postpartum. Few studies met our inclusion criteria thus limiting analysis of data. Based on these two papers, further prospective research is suggested. The final chapter of this thesis outlines a developing PhD project that addresses gaps identified through the scoping and systematic reviews.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2010-11
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Nursing
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3T69S
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Faculty of Nursing
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Dr. Kathleen Hunter (Faculty of Nursing)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Dr. Katherine Moore (Faculty of Nursing)
    • Dr. Gary Gray (Faculty of Medicine)