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Four Eighths Hephaistos: Artifacts and Living Things in Aristotle

  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
  • Introduction: There is considerable dispute in the literature as to how much, in Aristotle's universe, artifacts and living things really have in common. To what extent is the relation between form and matter in living things comparable to the relation between form and matter in artifacts? Aristotle no doubt employs artifact-analogies rather frequently in describing the workings of living things. But where does the usefulness of these analogies reach its limits? Spheres, to use one of Aristotle's favorite examples, can be made of bronze, wood, stone, or any other kind of matter, as long as it is suitable for the purpose at hand. Is the same true for plants and animals?

  • Date created
    1997
  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Type of Item
    Article (Published)
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R31C1TW4V
  • License
    © 1997 K. Koslicki et al. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original author(s) and source must be cited.
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  • Citation for previous publication
    • Koslicki, K. (1997). Four Eighths Hephaistos: Artifacts and Living Things in Aristotle. History of Philosophy Quarterly, 14(1), 77-98. http://www.jstor.org/stable/27744731
  • Link to related item
    http://www.jstor.org/stable/27744731