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The effects of catch-up (compensatory) growth on reproductive performance of beef heifers

  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
  • Fifty-four heifer calves were allocated to five feeding/weaning treatments at birth in April/May 1990: 1) VEW (n = 11) dams feed-restricted for 3 mo before and 2 mo after calving; calves weaned in June onto gram-supplemented pasture and then into a drylot in October; 2) EW1 (n = 10) dams not restricted; calves weaned in August (unsupplemented pasture) into drylot in October; 3) EW2 (n = 10) dams not feed-restricted; calves weaned directly into drylot in August; 4) LW1 (n = 12) dams feed restricted for 3 mo before, but not after calving; calves weaned directly into drylot in October, 5) LW2 (n = 11): dams not restricted; calves weaned directly into drylot in October. The very early (VEW) and early (EW1, EW2) weaned heifers grew significantly slower than the later-weaned ones (LW1, LW2) from birth to September, and were still significantly lighter at 12–13 mo of age (May 1991). Recovery of liveweight-for-age was achieved by EW2 heifers by 18 mo and VEW and EW1 by about 23 mo of age. Early weaning treatments delayed age but not weight at first estrus (P < 0.05) yet the number of heifers conceiving and calving, and all associated reproductive data, including rebreeding success were unaffected by treatment (P > 0.05). Despite a delay in first estrus, reproductive efficiency and calving performance were not impaired by early feed restriction in heifers conceiving at 15 mo of age.

  • Date created
    1996
  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Type of Item
    Article (Published)
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R36D5PC99
  • License
    @1996 Boadi, D., Price, M. A. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original author(s) and source must be cited.
  • Language
  • Citation for previous publication
    • Boadi, Dinah and Price, M.A. (1996). The effects of catch-up (compensatory) growth on reproductive performance of beef heifers. Canadian Journal of Animal Science, 76(4), 523 - 529. doi: 10.4141/cjas96-079
  • Link to related item
    http://dx.doi.org/10.4141/cjas96-079