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Lessons from Shakespeare’s tiger mothers: Parental and political authority in Coriolanus and Merchant of Venice

  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
  • Introduction: Yale Law Professor Amy Chua's memoire Battle Hmn of the TigerMotherl created a media sensation. 2 The book struck a powerful chord as hundreds clamoured to register either horror or approval of Chua's confessing to and advocating for a model of mothering that mixes in equal measure asceticism, relentless demands for public achievement, and love (albeit conditional). Many saw Chua's tract as little more than a self-serving apology for child abuse. Others viewed her sometimes astonishingly honest expose as a refreshing antidote to the cult of self-esteem that predominates the theory and practice of childrearing at the beginning of the twenty-first century.3

  • Date created
    2014-01-01
  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Type of Item
    Article (Published)
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3TQ5RV6N
  • License
    © 2014 Northern Ireland Legal Quarterly. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original author(s) and source must be cited.
  • Language
  • Citation for previous publication
    • Acorn, A., & Clackson, K. (2014). Lessons from Shakespeare’s tiger mothers: Parental and political authority in Coriolanus and Merchant of Venice. Northern Ireland Legal Quarterly, 65(1), 121. Retrieved from http://www.heinonline.org/HOL/Page?handle=hein.journals/nilq65&div=11