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Numerical Investigations of the Plasma Actuator Flow Problem

  • Author / Creator
    Manuel, Ajay P.
  • The Single Dielectric Barrier Discharge (SDBD) plasma actuator is currently considered as one among the many promising active flow-control devices. Research interest in modeling the plasma actuator is motivated by the fundamental principle of facilitating the prediction of airflow over different object configurations, and gaining further knowledge on plasma and flow properties in aerospace environments. Two categories of plasma actuator models exist: Phenomenological (or Simplified), and First-principles-based models. First-principles-based models are generally more complex and computationally intensive compared to Phenomenological models. This work focuses on such numerical investigations of the plasma actuator. In specific, this thesis is a comparative study of Kinetic, Hybrid, and Fluid models of the SDBD plasma actuator. Two particular models are considered including an Electrostatic (Fluid) model proposed by Orlov et al., and a Particle-in-Cell (Hybrid) model constructed by the author. The two models are tested with different configurations and environmental parameters commonly encountered in the SDBD plasma actuator flow problem. The codes are separately verified, and validated by the comparison of results obtained to supporting literature. The electric field, electric potential, and plasma body forces are accurately modeled, albeit with minor differences. Suggestions for corrections and modifications for model development, and efficiency were also outlined, along with the necessary prerequisite research and an agenda for future prospects.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2016-06:Fall 2016
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3KW57P8Q
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Physics
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Sydora, Richard (Physics)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Marchand, Richard (Physics), Sutherland, Bruce R. (Physics)