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Investigation of intermittent electrical stimulation as a potential prophylaxis against the formation of deep pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury

  • Author / Creator
    Gyawali, Selina
  • Deep tissue injury (DTI) is a severe form of pressure ulcers resulting from ischemia and mechanical damage due to unrelieved pressure. Despite many preventative methods, none so far has significantly reduced the incidence of DTI. The use of a novel method of pressure ulcer prevention, intermittent electrical stimulation (IES), was investigated. The current study investigated the effects of IES on surface pressure and tissue oxygenation in individuals with SCI. The results demonstrated that IES induced contractions caused significant reductions in pressure around the ischial tuberosities, as well as significant and sustained increases in oxygenation. Direct measurements of oxygen in an invasive rodent model indicated that IES induced contractions resulted in a 20-100% increase in tissue oxygenation. The results indicate that IES directly targets the pathogenic factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers and thereby may be an effective method for the prevention of DTI.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2009-11
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R34351
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Centre for Neuroscience
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Mushahwar, Vivian (Cell Biology)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Gordon, Tessa (Centre for Neuroscience)
    • Thompson, Richard (Biomedical Engineering)
    • Ferguson-Pell, Martin (Rehabilitation Medicine)