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Talk to me: Parental linguistic practices may hold the key to reducing incidence of language impairment and delay among multiple birth children

  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
  • Researchers have long known that multiple-birth children are predisposed toward language impairment and delay. Proposed explanations include the frequentlow birth weight of multiple birth children, unspecified genetic factors, and differences in the linguistic environment that seem to correlate with language impairment. In the current study, the linguistic environment of a set of triplets was compared to that of their singleton cousin through analysis of videotapes of family interaction. The triplets' linguistic environment seemed to be very similar to that of the singleton (at 2;3.14, 2;4.25 and 2;7.25). Further, the triplets' MLUs had reached the normal range for their age by the time of the last taping (4;4.7). The results support contentions that linguistic environment is paramount in determining language development in multiple-birth children.

  • Date created
    2005
  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Type of Item
    Article (Published)
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3QV3CH4B
  • License
    © 2005 Kwong, T., & Nicoladis, E. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original author(s) and source must be cited.
  • Language
  • Citation for previous publication
    • Kwong, T., and Nicoladis, E. (2005). Talk to me: Parental linguistic practices may hold the key to reducing incidence of language impairment and delay among multiple birth children. Canadian Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, 29(1), 6-13.
  • Link to related item
    http://www.cjslpa.ca/detail.php?ID=897&lang=en