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R. v. Seaboyer: Pornographic imagination and the springs of relevance

  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
  • Introduction: Section 276 of the Criminal Code of Canada provided that, in a trial for sexual assault, the accused could not (other than in limited circumstances) adduce evidence of the sexual conduct of the complainant with persons other than the accused. The section was introduced1 as an attempt to eradicate the effects of the assumption explicitly accepted by the common law that a woman who had sexual relations outside of marriage was likely to consent to any sexual activity and was also likely to lie under oath.2

  • Date created
    1991-01-01
  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Type of Item
    Article (Published)
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R30G3HD0D
  • License
    © 1991 A. Acorn. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original author(s) and source must be cited.
  • Language
  • Citation for previous publication
    • Acorn, Annalise. (1991). R. v. Seaboyer: Pornographic imagination and the springs of relevance. Constitutional Forum, 3(2), 25-28. Retrieved from http://heinonline.org/HOL/Page?handle=hein.journals/consfo3&div=19&g_sent=1&collection=journals