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UKRAINIAN CANADIANS: THE MANIFESTATION OF CULTURAL IDENTITY THROUGH FOLK BALLADS

  • Author / Creator
    Shevchenko, Victoria
  • Large scale immigration of Ukrainians to Canada could be divided into four major waves according to the date of arrival. Each immigration wave cultivated a unique set of cultural practices, including folklore narratives, music and dance. A profound adjustment of the world-view occurs based on the realities faced, including unfamiliar conditions and authentic folklore changes. The study of a folk ballad is particularly interesting in this respect, as it has been retained as the most popular folklore genre within the Ukrainian community in Canada. Based on the series of interviews, carried out by Robert B. Klymasz in Saskatchewan and Manitoba in 1964-1965, as well as the fieldwork, done in Ukraine in 2009, and in Edmonton, Alberta in 2011-2012, this study discusses how the singing repertoire of Ukrainian Canadians changed after their immigration, and how there repertoires differed depending on the period in which they immigrated.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2012-06
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Arts
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3P426
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies
  • Specialization
    • Ukrainian Folklore
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Kononenko, Natalie (MLCS)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Nahachewsky, Andriy (MLCS)
    • Kononenko, Natalie (MLCS)
    • Himka, John-Paul (History & Classics)