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Where electrical stimulation is delivered affects how contractions are generated in the tibialis anterior muscle

  • Author / Creator
    Okuma, Yoshino
  • This thesis describes experiments designed to investigate how motor units in tibialis anterior (TA) were recruited when electrical stimulation was applied over the TA muscle belly versus the common peroneal nerve trunk. The data from the first study (Chapter 2) showed that contractions were generated predominantly by depolarizing motor axons, regardless of stimulation site. The second study (Chapter 3) showed that single pulses of stimulation delivered over the muscle belly recruited motor units from superficial to deep as stimulation amplitude increased, but single pulses delivered over the nerve trunk recruited motor units evenly throughout the muscle, regardless of stimulus amplitude. Contrary to the results of Chapter 3, the final study (Chapter 4) provided preliminary evidence to suggest that repetitive stimulation recruited motor units from superficial to deep, regardless of stimulation site. In general, these findings support the idea that where electrical stimulation is delivered markedly affects how contractions are generated.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2012-11
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3DX4D
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Centre for Neuroscience
    • Physical Education and Recreation
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Dr. Kelvin Jones (Physical Education and Recreation, Centre for Neuroscience)
    • Dr. David Collins (Physical Education and Recreation, Centre for Neuroscience)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Dr. Monica Gorassini (Biomedical Engineering, Centre for Neuroscience)
    • Dr. David Collins (Physical Education and Recreation, Centre for Neuroscience)
    • Dr. Kelvin Jones (Physical Education and Recreation, Centre for Neuroscience)