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NORMAL AND PATHOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE RODENT PRIMORDIAL DIAPHRAGM

  • Author / Creator
    Abou Marak Dit Roum, Darine
  • The focus of this thesis work was toward advancing our understanding of the normal and pathological development of the diaphragm. This included: (1) studies of the embryology of the primordial diaphragm tissue, the pleuroperitoneal fold (PPF), as it relates to congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), and (2) investigating the relationship between migrating Schwann cells, phrenic axons and muscle cells in the developing diaphragm. The primary method of investigation was immunolabeling of the phrenic nerve, Schwann cells, muscle cells and the amuscular cellular component of the PPF and the diaphragm using the nitrofen model of CDH and transgenic mouse models. Together, these data provide the foundation for novel directions of research into CDH pathogenesis and specifically advance our understanding of: (1) the mechanism of CDH pathogenesis with special focus on PPF mesenchymal cells; and (2) the mechanism of axonal guidance and intramuscular branching.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2011-06
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3RH17
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Physiology
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Dr. John Greer ( Department of Physiology)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Dr. Simon Gosgnach (Department of Physiology)
    • Dr. Gregory Funk ( Department of Physiology)
    • Dr. Alan Underhill ( Department of Medical Genetics)