Sociodemographic patterns of leisure-time physical activity of Albertans 2000 to 2011

  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
  • Background: Physical inactivity has been a significant health concern among the Canadian population over the last decade. Purpose: To study the trend in leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) of Albertans from 2000 to 2011 and to assesses the relationship between sociodemographic factors and LTPA. Methods: Cross-sectional design was used. Data were obtained in 2000 (n = 1200), 2002 (n = 1209), 2005 (n = 1208), 2006 (n=1207), 2008 (n=1313) and 2010 (n=1202) through representative random telephone surveys. The Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire was used for all three surveys, in addition to questions about sociodemographic information (age, income, education, marital status). Men and women were considered active if they expended at least 38 or 35 metabolic equivalents (METs) per week, respectively. Results: From 2000 to 2005, the proportion of active Albertans increased from 54.2% to 60.2% whereas from 2006 to 2011 it decreased from 57.4% to 54.3%. Controlling for sex, logistic regression analyses showed that, compared to the youngest adults, the oldest adults were the least likely to be active (OR = 0.16 to 0.55) over the last decade. The highest quintile of income was the most likely to be active from 2000 to 2008 (OR = 1.96 to 2.28). Education was not related to LTPA. Conclusion: Older age remained a risk for inactivity over the decade and high income supported LTPA until 2008. Marital status inconsistently affected activity status in Albertans over the last decade. Education was not related to LTPA.

  • Date created
    2012
  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Type of Item
    Article (Published)
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R32Z12W2Z
  • License
    Attribution 3.0 International
  • Language
  • Citation for previous publication
    • Loitz, C. C., Fraser, S. N., Garcia Bengoechea, E., Berry, T. R., McGannon, K. R. & Spence, J. C. (2012). Sociodemographic patterns of leisure-time physical activity of Albertans 2000 to 2011. The Health and Fitness Journal of Canada, 5, 3-15.