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Non-Consequentialism Demystified

  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
  • Morality seems important, in the sense that there are practical reasons — at least for most of us, most of the time — to be moral. A central theoretical motivation for consequentialism is that it appears clear that there are practical reasons to promote good outcomes, but mysterious why we should care about non-consequentialist moral considerations or how they could be genuine reasons to act. In this paper we argue that this theoretical motivation is mistaken, and that because many arguments for consequentialism rely upon it, the mistake substantially weakens the overall case for consequentialism. We argue that there is indeed a theoretical connection between good states and reasons to act, because good states are those it is fitting to desire and there is a conceptual connection between the fittingness of a motive and reasons to perform the acts it motivates. But while some of our motives are directed at states, others are directed at acts themselves. We contend that just as the fittingness of desires for states generates reasons to promote the good, the fittingness of these act-directed motives generates reasons to do other things. Moreover, we argue that an act’s moral status consists in the fittingness of act-directed feelings of obligation to perform or avoid performing it, so the connection between fitting motives and reasons to act explains reasons to be moral whether or not morality directs us to promote the good. This, we contend, de-mystifies how there could be non-consequentialist reasons that are both moral and practical.

  • Date created
    2015
  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Type of Item
    Article (Published)
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3HD7P69M
  • License
    Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivs 4.0 International
  • Language
  • Citation for previous publication
    • Nye, H., Plunkett, D., & Ku, J. (2015). Non-Consequentialism Demystified. Philosophers’ Imprint, 15(4), 1-28. http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.3521354.0015.004
  • Link to related item
    http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.3521354.0015.004