Usage
  • 61 views
  • 191 downloads

THREE-DIMENSIONAL OUTCROP MODELLING, SEDIMENTOLOGY, AND ICHNOLOGY OF THE FALHER D MEMBER, NORTHEAST BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA

  • Author / Creator
    Acikelli, Arzu
  • The Lower Cretaceous Falher Member is an important hydrocarbon reservoir in the Deep
    Basin of Alberta and British Columbia. Owing to its economic importance, it has been the subject
    of many studies. However, there remains contention on the depositional interpretation of
    individual Falher Member conglomerate units. Both shoreface and wave-dominated deltaic
    models have been proposed. As such, the Falher Member is an ideal outcrop analog that can be
    used to assess the spatial distribution of component lithofacies and sedimentary features of
    shoreface and wave-dominated delta deposits.
    The present research uses sedimentology and ichnology, within the context of 3D
    photogrammetric models, of several Falher-equivalent outcrop successions on Mount Spieker in
    northeastern British Columbia. Facies distributions and relationships are assessed through 3D
    outcrop models and collected field data. The presence of fluid mud lenses, terrestrial fossil
    fragments, and impoverished suites of trace fossils confirm that the study interval was deposited
    proximal to a fluvial sediment source. The abundance of HCS sandstone units and pebbly storm
    lags indicates robust storm-wave reworking at the time of deposition. The along-strike
    heterogeneity in facies distribution is interpreted as evidence for delta asymmetry. The proposed
    depositional model suggests that strong longshore currents were the main reason for delta
    asymmetry. In this wave-dominated deltaic setting, the updrift side presents better reservoir
    targets including thick, clast-supported conglomerate units. The downdrift side consists of finer
    grained argillaceous deposits representing poorer reservoir quality. This study documents the
    sedimentology of the studied outcrops and discusses the depositional processes causing the
    heterogeneity in facies type and distribution in a wave-dominated, gravel-dominated delta setting.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    Fall 2022
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/r3-3ecn-zr76
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Library with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.