Usage
  • 40 views
  • 177 downloads

Design, high-level synthesis, and discrete optimization of digital filters based on particle swarm optimization

  • Author / Creator
    Hashemi, Seyyed Ali
  • This thesis is concerned with the development of a novel discrete particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique and its application to the discrete optimization of digital filter frequency response characteristics on the one hand, and the high-level synthesis of bit-parallel digital filter data-paths on the other. Two different techniques are presented for the optimization of sharp-transition band frequency response masking (FRM) digital filters, one of which is based on the conventional finite impulse-response (FIR) digital subfilters, and a new hardware-efficient approach which is based on utilizing infinite impulse-response (IIR) digital subfilters. It is shown that further hardware efficiency can be achieved by realizing the IIR interpolation subfilters by using the bilinear-LDI approach. The corresponding discrete PSO is carried out over the canonical signed digit (CSD) multiplier coefficient space for direct mapping to digital hardware considering simultaneous magnitude and group-delay frequency response characteristics. A powerful encoding scheme is developed for the high-level synthesis of digital filters based on discrete PSO, which preserves the data dependency relationships in the digital filter data-paths. In addition, a constrained discrete PSO is developed to overcome the limitations which would manifest themselves if the conventional PSO were to be used. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the application of discrete PSO to the design, high-level synthesis and optimization of digital filters.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2011-11
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3171Z
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Nowrouzian, Behrouz (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Moez, Kambiz (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
    • Han, Bin (Mathematical and Statistical Sciences)
    • Dinavahi, Venkata (Electrical and Computer Engineering)