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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3WP9TF8V

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An exploratory study comparing pre-service teachers’ experiences and perceptions of e-professionalism Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
pre-service teachers
social networking
e-professionalism
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
McCallum, Kendra N.
Supervisor and department
Poth, Cheryl (Educational Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Walton, Jennifer (Pediatrics)
Ross, Shelley (Family Medicine)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization
Psychological Studies in Education
Date accepted
2013-09-20T14:50:06Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
E-professionalism is a pressing issue in the digital age as internet and social networking become increasingly integrated into society’s way of communicating and accessing information (Kaczmarczyk et al., 2013). Given their role in society, teachers, in particular, are faced with challenges as they attempt to balance their personal lives and professional obligations in the digital age (Garner & Sullivan, 2010). This study explored e-professionalism by comparing the perceptions and experiences of pre-service teachers who differed in their opinions related to whether maintaining professionalism online is possible. Four focus groups were conducted, and an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis approach identified five themes related to barriers and enablers of e-professionalism. Implications of the current study are discussed related to maintaining relevant and attainable professional standards for teachers within an evolving digital environment; and specifically for informing initial teacher education programs and developing technology-related policies.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3WP9TF8V
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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