ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of The impact of social context on conservation auctions: social capital, leadership and crowding outDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R37896

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

The impact of social context on conservation auctions: social capital, leadership and crowding out Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
environmental policy
crowding out
beneficial management practices
conservation auction
competitive tender
leadership
reverse auction
social capital
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Kits, Gerda Johanna
Supervisor and department
Adamowicz, Wiktor (Department of Resource Economics & Environmental Sociology)
Examining committee member and department
Nostbakken, Linda (Department of Economics)
Dridi, Chokri (Department of Resource Economics & Environmental Sociology)
Boxall, Peter (Department of Resource Economics & Environmental Sociology)
Belcher, Ken (School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan)
Davidson, Debra (Department of Resource Economics & Environmental Sociology)
Department
Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-22T20:49:03Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
Conservation auctions are a policy tool that can be used to cost-effectively achieve environmental goals, by providing incentives for landowners to adopt environmentally friendly beneficial management practices (BMPs) on their land. Using a competitive bidding process, the party interested in encouraging BMP adoption selects and enters into contract with landowners, who receive monetary compensation in return for their adoption of the new practices. Previous research on conservation auctions has focused mainly on various design choices which can impact auction performance. This study takes a different approach, examining the influence of the social context in which auctions take place. Real auctions may be implemented in communities with varying levels of social capital and leadership. Since these factors have been shown to influence individual behaviour in a variety of settings, we hypothesize that they may also influence bidder behaviour within a conservation auction and, in turn, the cost-effectiveness and environmental outcomes of the auction. Using simulated auctions in an experimental setting, we sort participants into experimental treatments based on social capital and leadership characteristics. We find that both social capital and leadership do indeed have multi-dimensional, context-specific effects on bidder behaviour and auction outcomes. In addition, real auctions may take place in communities where some landowners have already adopted BMPs, driven by pro-social or pro-environmental “internal” motivations. Previous research has found that such motivations may be crowded out by the introduction of “external” motivations such as fines or regulation. We show, using an experimental approach, that conservation auctions also appear to cause crowding out of voluntary pro-environmental behaviour. This research contributes to the academic literature by linking theories of social capital and leadership to the literature on conservation auctions, and extending the literature on crowding out to this specific policy mechanism. In addition, it provides an innovative way of investigating the influence of social factors within an experimental setting. There are also important policy implications, as our findings draw attention to the importance of considering social context when designing and implementing conservation auctions.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R37896
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-28T21:10:30.528+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 572779
Last modified: 2015:10:12 18:51:53-06:00
Filename: Kits_Gerda_Fall 2011.pdf
Original checksum: 3cca20dd9c9dc3618435b2752fb9f072
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File title: ������������������������������������������������������������
File title: Kits_Gerda_Fall 2011
File author: ���������������
File author: gkits
Page count: 133
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date