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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R32W9V

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Pinball: High-Speed Real-Time Tracking and Playing Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Artificial Intelligence
Computer Vision
Pinball
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Metcalf, Adam
Supervisor and department
Sturtevant, Nathan (Computing Science)
Schaeffer, Jonathan (Computing Science)
Examining committee member and department
Szafron, Duane (Computing Science)
Tavakoli, Mahdi (Electrical & Computer Engineering)
Department
Department of Computing Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-07-07T16:39:51Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Pinball is fast-paced arcade-style game of which the origins date back hundreds of years. Game playing robots exist for billiards, foosball, and soccer and each have their own unique challenges. The speed that balls move in pinball machines requires that players have quick reactions. We created a framework for Artificial Intelligence research using a Lord of the Rings pinball machine. Communication with the pinball machine is accomplished through an interface implemented in pinball games created with the University of South California's pinball controller. The framework is built around a real-time vision system for ball detection that uses a physics simulator to filter results. A network multi-player pinball protocol was created which opens new directions for creating new pinball games. To test the framework we recorded how long players can keep a single ball in play. This is the first attempt at building a high-performance pinball-playing robot.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R32W9V
Rights
License granted by Adam Metcalf (ametcalf@cs.ualberta.ca) on 2011-07-06T17:53:06Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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