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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3J618

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State translation in no-limit poker Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
poker
translation
game theory
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Schnizlein, David
Supervisor and department
Bowling, Michael
Szafron, Duane
Examining committee member and department
Kolfal, Bora (Business)
Schaeffer, Jonathan (Computing Science)
Department
Department of Computing Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-08-11T17:09:54Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
One way to create a champion level poker agent is to compute a Nash Equilibrium in an abstract version of the poker game. The resulting strategy is then used to play in the full game. With this approach, translation is required between the full and abstract games in order to use the abstract strategy. In limit poker this translation step is defined when the abstraction is chosen. However, when considering no-limit poker the translation process becomes more complicated. We formally describe the process of translation and investigate its consequences. We examine how the current method, hard translation, can result in exploitable agents and introduce a new probabilistic method, soft translation, that produces more robust players. We also investigate how switching between strategies with different underlying abstractions affects the performance of an agent.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3J618
Rights
License granted by David Schnizlein (schnizle@cs.ualberta.ca) on 2009-08-05T22:20:01Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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