ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Ambivalence, the external gaze and negotiation: exploring mixed race identityDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3H719

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Ambivalence, the external gaze and negotiation: exploring mixed race identity Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Edmonton
Negotiation
Identity
External gaze
Questioning
Canada
Young-adults
Mixed race
Ambivalence
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Paragg, Jillian E.
Supervisor and department
Dorow, Sara (Sociology)
Examining committee member and department
Kaler, Amy (Sociology)
Abu-Laban, Yasmeen (Political Science)
Department
Department of Sociology
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-06-01T21:55:07Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Between fall 2009 and fall 2010 I conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with 19 young-adult women and men of mixed race in Edmonton, Alberta. A prominent theme that emerged was being asked the question ‘what are you?’. I position the ‘moment’ of being questioned as a manifestation of the external gaze. People of mixed race are subject to questioning because they do not fit within dominant racial binaries: they exceed the limited horizon of possible narratives of racial discourse and are socially identified as ambivalent (Anzaldua 1987). Within the literature on the ‘racial gaze,’ it is often positioned as something that fixes (Fanon 1967). However, the very ambivalence people of mixed race pose to the gaze allows them to negotiate it. The narratives of my respondents demonstrate that the inability of the social gaze to ‘fix’ them opens up the possibility of making identity through negotiating the gaze in multiple ways.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3H719
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-29T16:29:11.918+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 582604
Last modified: 2015:10:12 14:58:50-06:00
Filename: Paragg_Jillian_Fall 2011.pdf
Original checksum: a8f223aefbc53c115a1fffdb02b196b7
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File title: Thesis_Final
File author: Jillian Paragg
Page count: 149
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date