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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3S07N

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Refinery Power Distribution Reliability and Interruption Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
impact
refinery
simulation
interruption
zone-branch
random
model
cut-set
reliability
cascade
cascading
criticality
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Nygren, Leif
Supervisor and department
Koval, Don (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Dinavahi, Venkata (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Joseph, Dil (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Knight, Andrew (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Zuo, Ming (Mechanical Engineering)
Department
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-05-28T15:18:58Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
In the refining industry, the cost of a power system interruption is dominated by an associated loss of production. Power distribution within a refinery includes a set of production units within a highly inter-dependent process, where the outage of a single unit affects the production of additional units. This thesis proposes a method to quantify the impact of this cascading effect, called the criticality enhancement function, in which a process reliability model is introduced to link electrical outage cut-sets with lost production. Power system criticality is analyzed using four different approaches to the calculation of annual expected impact from load point interruptions on a case study of the 125,000 barrel-per-day Petro-Canada Edmonton Refinery. This thesis demonstrates how employment of the proposed technique, with its marriage of electrical and process reliability models, enables the most accurate estimation of the impact of power system interruptions.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3S07N
Rights
License granted by Leif Nygren (lnygren@ualberta.net) on 2009-05-28T13:48:58Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: Chapter 1 ��� Introduction
File title: Microsoft Word - Nygren_Leif_Fall 2009.doc
File author: Leif Nygren
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