ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Effects of Disfluencies on Listeners’ Processing of SpeechDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3BK16V3B

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Effects of Disfluencies on Listeners’ Processing of Speech Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Acknowledgement
Linguistics
Filled Pause
Language Processing
Self-acknowledgement
Stuttering
Fluency
Speech-Language Pathology
Visual World Paradigm
Psycholinguistics
Eyetracking
Disfluency
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Leonard, Catherine M
Supervisor and department
Langevin, Marilyn (Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders)
Järvikivi, Juhani (Department of Linguistics)
Examining committee member and department
Charest, Monique (Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders)
Kim, Esther (Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders)
Cummine, Jacqueline (Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders)
Department
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Specialization
Speech-Language Pathology
Date accepted
2015-10-16T10:39:31Z
Graduation date
2016-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Background. Stuttered speech (e.g., th-ththth-th-ththth-the car) and typical disfluencies (e.g., thee uh car) have some similarities. Previous research describes a tendency in listeners to predict that a speaker will refer to an unfamiliar object, rather than a familiar one, when both are equally plausible referents in a verbal instruction that contains a typical disfluency. This is referred to as the unfamiliarity bias. When listeners have reason to believe that the speaker’s disfluency may not be reliably tied to word familiarity, the unfamiliarity bias can be suspended. Purpose. The first aim of this study was to determine if stuttering would have the same effect on listeners’ processing of language as do typical disfluencies. The second aim of this study was to investigate whether such effects on language processing would be suspended when listeners were informed that they would hear a person who stutters. Methods. The EyeLink 1000 Plus system was used to collect data from 52 participants. Analyses of variance, with factors of acknowledgement (acknowledgment, non-acknowledgement), target type (familiar, unfamiliar), and fluency (fluent, typically disfluent, stuttered) were used to analyze each dependent variable. Data were analyzed by subjects and by items. Dependent measures were the proportion of looks to the target object and proportion of looks to the competitor object, out of looks to all objects. Planned comparisons were subsequently conducted using pairwise t-tests. Results. The unfamiliarity bias was found with typical and stuttered disfluencies when the target type was unfamiliar, however, acknowledgement of stuttering did not suspend this bias. Conclusions. Listeners responded to stuttered disfluencies in a manner similar to typical disfluencies, but were not affected by the acknowledgement. Further investigation is warranted to better describe the effects of stuttering on speech processing and mitigating factors.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3BK16V3B
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2015-10-16T16:39:32.272+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (PDF/A)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 1382425
Last modified: 2016:06:16 17:00:58-06:00
Filename: Leonard_Catherine_M_201510_MSc.pdf
Original checksum: 6ead79535c0550d7ec1c9a98423d0e44
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date