ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Treatment of oily drill cuttings slurries using supercritical carbon dioxideDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3535B

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Treatment of oily drill cuttings slurries using supercritical carbon dioxide Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
supercritical fluid
extraction
hydrocarbon
water
drill cuttings
slurry
carbon dioxide
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Jones, Christopher Robert
Supervisor and department
Guigard, Selma (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Hashisho, Zaher (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Saldana, Marleny (Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutritional Sciences)
Department
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-04-09T22:18:19Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Research was conducted into using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) for removing hydrocarbons from drill cuttings slurries, which will be used in a pilot-scale continuous SFE system currently under development. A laboratory-scale batch SFE system employing supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) was used in this research. Based on the measured hydrocarbon solubility and apparent hydrocarbon solubility in supercritical CO2, conditions of 14.5 MPa and 40oC were selected for SFE treatment. The slurries require a minimum water to drill cuttings ratio of 1:1 (mass basis) to be “free-flowing” and therefore suitable for treatment in a continuous system. Water in the slurries leads to lower hydrocarbon extraction efficiencies during SFE treatment compared to the treatment of drill cuttings without slurrying. However, effective mixing and introduction of the supercritical CO2 at the bottom of the extraction vessel resulted in treated slurries containing less than 1% hydrocarbons (dry mass basis).
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3535B
Rights
License granted by Christopher Jones (crj1@ualberta.ca) on 2010-04-08T19:34:30Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-29T20:48:56.040+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 21249638
Last modified: 2015:10:12 11:28:07-06:00
Filename: Jones_Christopher_Spring 2010.pdf
Original checksum: 9743474c39b5edcd356d04777e68687d
Well formed: true
Valid: true
Status message: File header gives version as 1.4, but catalog dictionary gives version as 1.3
File title: Thesis V6
File author: Chris Jones
Page count: 208
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date