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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3FH7Q

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Atwood, Moisan, and Beyond: The Question of Diversity in Comparative Canadian Literature Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Comparative
Literature
Canadian
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
McKay, Kristy Lynn
Supervisor and department
Braz, Albert (Comparative Literature)
Examining committee member and department
Sywenky, Irene (Comparative Literature)
Braz, Albert (Comparative Literature)
Carrière, Marie (Modern Languages and Cultural Studies)
Department
Comparative Literature
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-01-08T21:27:41Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The following consideration of methodologies in comparative Canadian literary criticism is influenced by Margaret Atwood’s Survival: A Thematic Guide to Canadian Literature, and Clément Moisan’s Poésie des frontières: étude comparée des poésies canadienne et québécoise. An analysis of the advances and pitfalls in Atwood’s and Moisan’s works of thematic criticism sheds light on what stands to be gained from a broader ground for comparison, one that relinquishes the need to capture all Canadian literary expressions under the net of a single study organized around language and culture. Translation emerges as both a model for such change, and a tool that facilitates a more fluid treatment of differences within recent studies. Contemporary comparisons by E.D. Blodgett, Sylvia Söderlind, Peter Dickinson, and Lianne Moyes seek to forge ahead despite the difficulties inherent to the discipline. Their methodologies demonstrate a desire to find new ways of reading Canadian literatures together, while recognizing Canada’s ever-expanding linguistic and cultural literary diversity.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3FH7Q
Rights
License granted by Kristy McKay (klmckay@ualberta.ca) on 2010-01-08T20:09:55Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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