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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3MG9P

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Executive Function Strategies used by Children and Adolescents with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
FASD
strategies
metacognition
executive function
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Hutchison, Marnie Lenore
Supervisor and department
Pei, Jacqueline (Educational Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Shanahan, Marie-Claire (Elementary Education)
Daniels, Lia (Educational Psychology)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-29T05:09:19Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The outcomes associated with prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) are profound, affecting many aspects of cognitive, behavioural, and social development that can be seen in the day-to-day health and functioning of affected individuals. Executive dysfunction has been identified as a particular area of weakness for children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Researchers using various neuropsychological tests suggest that children with FASD underperform on many executive functioning tasks; however, they do not tell us which strategies children with FASD are capable of using to aid executive function performance. Observational data was collected on the strategies used by seven children with FASD as they completed cognitively demanding computer games as part of a larger executive function intervention study. Results revealed that children and adolescents used any number of 25 different strategies to aid their executive functioning performance. Furthermore, they were able to increase the number of strategies they used spontaneously and decrease the number of strategies used through prompting over the course of the intervention. Overall, older participants used more spontaneous strategies and significantly fewer prompted strategies than younger children. These results suggest that children and adolescents with FASD can use a wide and varied battery of executive function strategies that if transferred outside of the intervention setting, could have a potentially positive effect on their daily functioning.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3MG9P
Rights
License granted by Marnie Hutchison (mhutchis@ualberta.ca) on 2011-09-28T20:21:47Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: Executive Function Strategies used by Children and Adolescents with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
File author: Marnie Hutchison
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