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Design and development of a two dimensional scanning molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) system

  • Author / Creator
    Ahmad, Farhan
  • The design and development of a MTV approach, based on photobleaching, is discussed. The MTV techniques developed so far for microfluidic application provide either only a one dimensional flow measurement or use a grid and a structured mask for macro-scale and micro-scale flows respectively. The developed system is capable of resolving two dimensional flow velocity information without the limitations associated with other approaches. The salient feature of the presented approach is the use of a laser scanner which allows unrestricted, repeatable and accurate movement of the write laser within the field-of-view. An assessment of the performance of the MTV system will be discussed with a comparison to traditional μ-PIV. The aim of this technique is to perform velocity measurements in a dielectrophoretic flow of a mixture of nano-particles and the caged fluorescent dye, which may show different flow behavior, possibly in two opposite directions due to the charge on them.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2011-11
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3C309
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Mechanical Engineering
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Dr. David S Nobes (Mechanical Engineering)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Dr. Anthony Yeung (Chemical and Materials Engineering)
    • Dr. Roger W. Toogood (Mechanical Engineering)