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Chromatographic separation of asphaltenes on silica materials

  • Author / Creator
    Razavilar, Negin
  • In this study, we describe the use of different silica materials to separate vanadium compounds from Asphaltenes. We used high performance flash chromatography separation method to separate asphaltenes at different solvent strengths on sea sand. The separation conditions were optimized for flow rate and the strength of the solvent. The selectivity of separation was determined based on asphaltene and metal recovery. With separation on sea sand as the solvent strength increased, the recovery percentage of the asphaltenes also increased. Similarly, stronger solvent blends give poor selectivity based on peak shifts in fluorescence spectra. The separation conditions were then used to compare the performance of a series of silica materials treated with alkaline earth metals. These samples were treated with the same molar concentration of reactant at the same temperature. Treatment of silica materials resulted in an increase in metals recovery and asphaltene recovery by providing less active sites for adsorption.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2009-11
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R36D0V
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Steven M.Kuznicki, Chemical and Materials Engineering
    • Murray R.Gray, Chemical and Materials Engineering
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Mark McDermott, Chemistry, University of Alberta