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Isolation of Reactive Bonding Environments in the Main Group via New Donor-Acceptor and Kinetic Stabilization Pathways

  • Author / Creator
    Al-Rafia, S. M. Ibrahim
  • The research presented in this Thesis is focused on the synthesis of highly reactive molecules featuring Group 14 elements with the aim of discovering new bonding environments which can be translated into new forms of reactivity. Kinetic stabilization with the use of sterically demanding ligands containing umbrella-shaped triarylsilyl groups was one of the approaches that was engaged in the pursuit of abovementioned goal. The area of research involving this strategy was the isolation of reactive bonds such as Ge=O and Ge=S double bonds. Due to the presence of a high degree of structural flexibility within the developed amidosilyl ligands, kinetic stabilization of the targeted reactive bonds was not successful. Nevertheless, the steric bulk offered by the amidosilyl ligands presented in this Thesis could be a useful component for future advancement of the transition metal chemistry. Electronic stabilization with the aid of Lewis basic donors and Lewis acidic acceptors was the other method explored to isolate reactive inorganic species in this Thesis. This donor-acceptor stabilization protocol was employed to isolate parent heavy Group 14 methylenes (EH2), ethylenes (H2E-EH2), hydridoamides (EH-NHDipp; E = Si, Ge and Sn) and oligo dichlorogermanes [(GeCl2)x, x >2]. The isolation of these reactive molecules in the form of stable adducts represents a promising avenue to study the chemistry of these species under milder condition (with possible applications as precursors to nanomaterials envisioned).

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2013-06
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Doctor of Philosophy
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3SX1P
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Doctoral
  • Department
    • Department of Chemistry
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Rivard, Eric
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Bergens, Steven H. (Department fo Chemistry)
    • Stryker, Jeffrey M. (Department of Chemistry)
    • Müller, Jens (Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan)
    • Gibbs-Davis, Julianne M. (Department of Chemistry)
    • de Klerk, Arno (Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering)