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Data Warehouse Approach to Historical Analysis of Vehicle Trajectory Data on a Road Network

  • Author / Creator
    Pareek, Priyanka
  • Personal devices such as smartphones or fitness bands enable users to record their movement information using GPS sensors, along with associated attribute data such as heart rate, speed, and elevation. Data collected using such devices include both, time-stamped recordings of object movement (called trajectories), and associated timeseries recorded for related attributes. Analysis of attribute information within the context of the path taken can be used to highlight important trends and similarities in movement of different objects. However, data volumes can make historical analysis of these data streams challenging without a proper pre-processing and data management strategy. In this thesis, we design and implement a data warehouse structure to enable exploratory analysis of movement information for objects traveling in a constrained environment (e.g. a road network). The proposed data warehouse design can be used to analyze differences in vehicle attributes for trips taken on common road segments, or contrast trip-level information for categories of vehicles. Further, we design a spatial partitioning technique that takes advantage of the road network topology and use it to approximate average attribute values for spatial queries. We demonstrate the benefits of our data warehouse structure and analyze the results of our approximation method using a dataset of haul trucks operating in a surface mining environment.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    Fall 2018
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3DJ58Z6R
  • License
    Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.