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A new voltzialean conifer, Emporia royalii sp nov. (Emporiaceae), from the Hamilton Quarry, Kansas.

  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
  • A new species of extinct conifer plants, Emporia royalii sp. nov. Hernandez-Castillo, Stockey, Mapes et Rothwell (Emporiaceae: Voltziales), is described from the rich fossil biota of the Late Pennsylvanian, Hamilton Quarry, Kansas. This conifer has lateral plagiotropic branches with simple and forked leaves, ‘‘age-dependent heterophylly,’’ simple pollen cones, and compound ovulate cones. Stems have an endarch eustele, dense wood, and secretory cells arranged in nests or plates in the pith. Leaves are amphistomatic with two adaxial stomatal bands and two longitudinal abaxial rows of stomata with numerous trichome bases. Pollen cones are simple and have helically arranged microsporophylls with adaxial pollen sacs. Prepollen is monolete and monosaccate (Potonieisporites Bharadwaj). Ovulate cones are compound with bilaterally symmetrical axillary dwarf shoots that bear up to 45 sterile scales and 1–2 sporophylls and occur in the axils of helically arranged bracts with forked tips. Ovules are inverted and winged and resemble those of Emporia lockardii and Emporia cryptica. Emporia royalii is compared to other Euramerican walchian Voltziales, and a summary of the Emporiaceae and evolution of Paleozoic conifers is given. This is the fifth species of extinct conifer plants to be reconstructed from the Hamilton Quarry, making it the only Paleozoic locality in the world with numerous conifers all of which have been characterized as complete or nearly complete plants.

  • Date created
    2009
  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Type of Item
    Article (Published)
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R31G34
  • License
    Copyright 2009 by The University of Chicago
  • Language
  • Citation for previous publication
    • Hernandez-Castillo, G.R., R.A. Stockey, G.W. Rothwell and G. Mapes. 2009. A new voltzialean conifer, Emporia royalii sp nov. (Emporiaceae), from the Hamilton Quarry, Kansas. International Journal of Plant Sciences 170: 1201-1227.