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Time Motion Characteristics and Heart Rate Profiles Displayed by Female University Ice Hockey Players

  • Author / Creator
    Jackson, Joel K
  • The purpose of this study was to estimate the demands of female Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) ice hockey through the use of time-motion analysis (TMA) and heart rate (HR) measurement during league games. A convenient sample of 22 female ice hockey players (14 forwards and 8 defense) underwent fitness testing and were filmed during league 3 CIS league games during which 13 players wore HR monitors. Time-motion analysis of the 3 games indicated that all players spent the majority of game time gliding forward (36.3 +/- 6.2%) and skating forward with moderate intensity (31.2 +/- 6.2%). There were significant differences in the frequency and duration of movement patterns between the 3 different games, periods and 2 positions during even strength play (p<0.05). There were also significant differences in the frequency and duration of movement patterns between the 3 different games, periods, and 2 positions during even strength play, penalty kills, and power plays (game-play situations) (p<0.05). All players displayed peak and mean HRs during shifts of 182 +/- 10 and 174 +/- 9 beats per minute (bpm), respectively, but there were no significant differences in any HR measurements between positions. The shift and game work to rest ratios for all players during even strength play were 1 to 1.6 +/- 0.5 and 1 to 3.7 +/- 1.0, respectively, but there were no significant differences in either work to rest ratio between the 3 games or the 2 positions. The findings indicate that female CIS ice hockey was characterized by bouts of repeated high intensity effort interspersed with periods of low intensity activity during shifts followed by extended periods of passive recovery between shifts and periods. Forwards and defense displayed significantly different movement patterns during games regardless of the game-play situation. It was also apparent that female players display markedly high HR responses during game-play which was an indication of a substantial cardiovascular demand in the sport.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2015-06
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3804XT18
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Physical Education and Recreation
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Gordon Bell (Physical Education and Recreation)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Dan Syrotuik (Physical Education and Recreation)
    • Gordon Bell (Physical Education and Recreation)
    • Vicki Harber (Physical Education and Recreation)