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From borderlands to bordered lands: the plains metis and the 49th parallel, 1869-1885

  • Author / Creator
    Pollock, Katie
  • The following study is an attempt to comprehend the impact that the Canadian-United States border along the forty-ninth parallel had on the Plains Metis between 1869 and 1885, and how members of this community continued to manipulate the border to meet their own objectives. From the 1860s to 1880s, state definitions of Metis status, as well as government recognition and non-recognition of Metis identity, had a profound impact on the Plains Metis. Imposed state classifications and statuses limited the choices of many to enter treaty, be recognised as a citizen, or reside in a partiuclar country. The implementation of these status definitions began after 1875 when the enforcement of the international boundary began in earnest, and it was this endforcement that represented the beginnings of the colonisation of the Plains Metis.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2009-11
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Arts
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R31X27
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of History and Classics
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Gerhard Ens, History and Classics, University of Alberta
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • David Mills, History and Classics, University of Alberta
    • Robert Irwin, History and Classics, University of Alberta
    • Gerhard Ens, History and Classics, University of Alberta
    • Chris Anderson, Native Studies, University of Alberta