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A Multi-Method Investigation of Educational Activities for Hospital-Based Healthcare Providers During the Covid-19 Pandemic

  • Author / Creator
    Clelland, Ashley D.
  • The Covid-19 pandemic was a period of intense stress for hospital-based healthcare providers (HCPs). Education was frequently proposed as a solution to support HCPs with pandemic-related distress, but little is known about what pandemic training and/or education looked like for hospital-based HCPs. In particular, there is no comprehensive description of pandemic education that covers: (1) what education was delivered, (2) how it was delivered, and (3) stakeholders’ experiences with education during this time. My thesis research aimed to fill these gaps using a multi-method approach, including a scoping review and semi-structured interviews with frontline HCPs and educators. I found that educational content primarily focussed on the topics of (1) clinical care of Covid-19 patients, and (2) infection prevention (including personal protective equipment use). Regarding instructional methods, I found that simulation and educational meetings were the most common. In terms of delivery, most activities were in-person; however, blended and virtual training was also prevalent. Stakeholders’ experiences highlighted both shared and unique challenges for HCP and educator groups. The interview results also suggested that HCPs hold differing opinions about content needs, instructional methods, and delivery. Overall, the findings provide an opportunity for providers, educators, and other healthcare leaders to reflect on training and education for the pandemic, and consider how to best develop supportive education both now and during future crises.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    Spring 2023
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Education
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/r3-0cjb-g155
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.