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Waking Ned Devine: une traduction franco acadienne pour locuteurs acadiens, franco-canadiens, et francophones d’ailleurs et partout

  • Author / Creator
    LeBlanc, Amélie F
  • The following study aimed to show the need for Franco-Canadian dubbings outside of France, and so as to elaborate the existing issues in audiovisual translation, the film Waking Ned Devine (2001) was translated into Acadian French (with Chiac components). The main goal of this study was to demonstrate that the universal French language used in French and Quebec dubbings is insufficient and often misunderstood by a vast majority of Franco-Canadian publics and Acadian publics in particular. The project thus includes an analysis of Ireland and Acadie’s sociocultural and sociolinguistic contexts as well as a portion of the translated film script written by Kirk Jones (1999). The translation was completed with the idea that a dubbing could eventually be produced with Acadian actors. During the research for this present memoir, a certain paradox became quite obvious: cinematographic production companies require that dubbings be made into standardized French, as much in France as in Quebec, and specifically ask that all forms of dialects and regionalisms be avoided. The result; most French dubbings are rigid, and almost artificial even, since Francophone publics do not speak this same neutral French which seems to come out of nowhere. This means, and is also due to a law put in place in France to protect French audiovisual translation rights, that a tremendously large number of American or Foreign films are dubbed twice into two standardized versions of French (in France and in Quebec) which are nearly identical and quite often despised by their targeted audiences.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2015-11
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Arts
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R31R6N80G
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    French
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies
  • Specialization
    • Translation Studies
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Malena, Anne (Modern Languages and Cultural Studies)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Malena, Anne (Modern Languages and Cultural Studies)
    • Stewart, Selina (History & Classics)
    • Reyns, Christian (Modern Languages and Cultural Studies)
    • Penrod, Lynn (Modern Languages and Cultural Studies)