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In Kind and Cash Payments in Experiments: Farmer Valuation of Seeds with Decreased Variance in Orissa, India

  • Author / Creator
    Hossack, Fiona I.
  • Evaluating the ex-ante willingness to pay (WTP) and adoption rates for pro-poor technologies is necessary to inform development interventions, the distribution and pricing of new technologies, and research and development. Unfortunately, a common practice of economic experiments that elicit value, paying participants in cash, is not always amenable to partner organizations in developing countries. Using a framed field experiment, an alternative in kind payment is explored and its effect on the valuation of yield stabilizing seed traits compared to that of cash. I find participants who are paid in kind with commonly bought household goods are willing to pay about 7% more than when they are paid in cash, suggesting that in kind remuneration may result in the overestimation of WTP. In addition, for a 6.9 INR reduction in the standard deviation, WTP was approximately 8% higher, suggesting that farmers value yield stabilizing seed traits like pest or drought resistance.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2013-06
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3RG75
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology
  • Specialization
    • Agricultural and Resource Economics
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • An, Henry (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Swallow, Brent (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
    • An, Henry (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
    • Boxall, Peter (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
    • Dyck, Miles (Renewable Resources)