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Magazine Images Depicting the Ideal Fit Male Body: An Outlet for Influencing Body Perceptions and Exercise Related Cognitions

  • Author / Creator
    Walker, Jessica L.
  • This study examined the effects of viewing health/fitness and sports magazine images on body perceptions and exercise related cognitions in males. The moderating effects of age were also examined. A series of 3 (image-only, magazine cover, control) by 3 (youngest, middle, oldest) ANOVA analyses with internalization, self-objectification, reasons for exercise, and exercise intentions as the dependent variables were conducted. Results from 280 male participants (mean age 36.34, range 18-68 years) showed that the image-only group displayed the greatest level of internalization-general: F(2, 271) = 5.65, p = .004, η² = .040. Additionally, older males reported the lowest level of internalization-general, F(2, 271) = 15.19, p = .000, η² = .101, internalization-athlete, F(2, 271) = 13.07, p = .000, η² = .088, and self-objectification, F(2, 271) = 6.13, p = .002, η² = .043. Findings help us gain a better understanding about the powerful force of the mass media and its effect on consumers.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2012-09
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Arts
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3TH74
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Physical Education and Recreation
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Tanya Berry (Physical Education and Recreation)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Tara-Leigh McHugh (Physical Education and Recreation)
    • Cameron Wild (School of Public Health)