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Is Participation in Family Role-play in Second Life Associated with Improved Social and Emotional Support and Well-Being Among Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders?

  • Author / Creator
    Gilmour, Laura
  • This study examines whether participation in Second Life (SL) among adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is associated with perceptions increased perceptions of emotional support and wellbeing. A total of 53 participants were included in the analysis: In the sample, 7 had ASD and used SL, 6 had ASD and did not use SL, 39 did not have ASD and were SL users, and 11 did not have ASD and did not use SL. Individuals with ASD who participated in SL rated themselves significantly higher on measures of social fun, emotional support, and flourishing in SL than they did on real life (RL) measures of these aspects. Individuals with ASD who participated in SL reported lower social fun in RL than those who did not participate in SL. Results of this study suggest that individuals who are attracted to SL, report poor social and emotional support and well-being offline.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2014-06
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Education
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3XT3N
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Educational Psychology
  • Specialization
    • Special Education
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Dr. Veronica Smith, Educational Psychology
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Dr. Cathy Adams, Secondary Education
    • Dr. George Buck, Educational Psychology