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Role of RASSF1A in intestinal inflammation

  • Author / Creator
    Zhao, YUewen
  • Ras association domain family 1 A (RASSF1A) is an important tumor suppressor, which expression is frequently lost in various cancers due to promoter hypermethylation. Chronic inflammation, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), can increase the risk of developing cancer. Rassf1a conventional knockout studies suggest its essential role in protection against dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. In this study, we further explored the role of Rassf1a in intestinal inflammation by utilizing an intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) specific knockout (Rassf1aIEC-KO) mouse model. We found that the Rassf1aIEC-KO mice are more susceptible to DSS-induced colitis. Central to the pro-inflammatory signaling is the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factor. We observed increased NF-κB DNA-binding activity in bone marrow cells and crypt cells in the Rassf1aIEC-KO mice. Our investigation demonstrates that the intestinal epithelial expression of Rassf1a is essential to protect the mice from DSS-induced intestinal inflammation, through the negative regulation of NF-κB activity.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2011-11
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3VQ64
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Biochemistry
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Baksh, Shairaz (Pediatrics)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Wine, Eytan (Pediatrics)
    • Madsen, Karen (Medicine)
    • Brindley, David (Biochemistry)