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Biomonitoring and elimination of Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) through perspiration: Blood, Urine, and Sweat (BUS) Study.

  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
  • Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are man-made organofluorine chemicals manufactured and marketed for their stain-resistant properties. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are anthropogenic organochlorine compounds previously used in various industrial and chemical applications prior to being banned in the Western world in the 1970s. Both PFCs and PCBs are persistent contaminants within the human organism and both have been linked to adverse health sequelae. Data is lacking on effective means to facilitate clearance of PFCs and PCBs from the body. Methods. Blood, urine, and sweat were collected from 20 individuals (10 healthy participants and 10 participants with assorted health problems) and analyzed for PFCs and PCBs using high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results. Some individual PCB congeners, but not all, were released into sweat at varying concentrations. None of the PFCs found in serum testing appeared to be excreted efficiently into perspiration. Conclusions. Induced perspiration may have some role in facilitating elimination of selected PCBs. Sweat analysis may be helpful in establishing the existence of some accrued PCBs in the human body. Sweating does not appear to facilitate clearance of accrued PFHxS (perfluorohexane sulfonate), PFOS (perfluorooctane sulfonate), or PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid), the most common PFCs found in the human body.

  • Date created
    2013
  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Type of Item
    Article (Published)
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3V570
  • License
    Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International
  • Language
  • Citation for previous publication
    • Genuis SJ, Beesoon S, Birkholz D. (2013) Biomonitoring and elimination of Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) through perspiration: Blood, Urine, and Sweat (BUS) Study. ISRN Toxicology. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/483832