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Mechanisms of Recovery in Acquired Alexia

  • Author / Creator
    Lemke, Shannon F
  • Reading impairment, known as alexia, frequently co-occurs with damage to the language areas of the brain in aphasia. Text-based reading treatments have been shown to improve reading fluency, but the mechanisms behind such improvement remain unclear. This study investigates the efficacy of Multiple Oral Rereading and Oral Reading for Language in Aphasia as a combined treatment for an individual with surface alexia, and examines whether eye-movements change as a result of treatment. Following treatment, reading rate and accuracy significantly improved on practiced passages, and improved reading rate generalized to novel passages. Generalization was also observed on a measure of spoken/written language. Eye-movements (number of fixations, regressions, and fixation durations) differed from pre-treatment to post-treatment and follow-up, although in the opposite direction of what was expected. Initial fixation position shifted towards that of more proficient readers after the completion of treatment, suggesting treatment resulted in a change in reading strategy.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2012-11
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3T33G
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Kim, Esther (Speech Pathology and Audiology)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Hopper, Tammy (Speech Pathology and Audiology)
    • Bolger, Patrick (Linguistics)
    • Kim, Esther (Speech Pathology and Audiology)